Stressed Out at the Office? Therapy Can Come to You

Finally!  Organizations are starting to appreciate the impact that stress (from all sorts of places) has on productivity!  This insightful article from last week's Wall Street Journal is inspiring. Real on,..


Source:  The Wall Street Journal

By:  Rachel Feintzeig


The therapist will see you now—in your office.

Companies from Dell Technologies Inc. DELL +3.76% to Delta Air Lines Inc. DAL +3.37% are bringing mental-health professionals into the workplace to offer on-site counseling for employees. One-third of large employers—those with 5,000 or more employees—plan to offer on-site behavioral-health counseling this year, up from a quarter of those companies in 2019 and less than one-fifth in 2018, according to a survey from the Business Group on Health.

Companies say the benefit can be a tool for improving employee performance and, ultimately retention. Employees want mental-health care but often struggle to find the help they need that fits their schedule or is included in their insurance coverage, say executives at several companies. In-house counseling can save time and money and boost workers’ resilience and productivity, as well as their overall health and well-being, say health-care experts and human-resources executives.

In the past, discussion of mental-health issues at the office was uncommon. Workers were largely expected to leave their personal struggles at home. Crying was confined to the bathroom stall.

Today, that’s changing. One reason is a broadening of the popular understanding of “mental health” to encompass anxiety, stress and other widespread issues.

It’s also a reflection of a changing workplace. Younger workers are more comfortable talking about their struggles and expect their employers to take emotional distress seriously, says Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor of organizational behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Senior leaders are responding, rolling out mental-health services and sometimes speaking about their own experiences. Lloyds Banking Group Plc chief executive António Horta-Osório has said publicly in recent years that the pressure he felt around the bank’s financial situation in 2011 dominated his thoughts, leaving him unable to sleep and exhausted. He took eight weeks off from the company to recover, working with a psychiatrist. The psychiatrist later helped him devise a mental-health program for Lloyds employees.

Brynn Brichet, a lead product manager at Cerner Corp., a maker of electronic medical-records systems, said she sometimes returns from her counseling appointments with an on-site therapist ... click here to continue reading.

 
 
 

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